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The University of Manchester
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Samuel Alexander Building, WG16
Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
Email: peter.scott@manchester.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)161 275 3064

 @lincolntheol

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The University of Manchester
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Samuel Alexander Building, WG8
Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
Email: michael.hoelzl@manchester.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)161 306 1663

 

What does it mean to exist in complex relationships with machines? What insights can be offered to our understandings of these relationships by the theologically significant theme of ‘love’? What critical assessments can be made of our multiple uses of technologies in shaping our futures, by reflecting on our pasts?

Project blog
Events and Outputs
> Conference: Care and Machines
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Disquiet over the prevalence of social and economic individualism has a long history. In a world of mobile Capital and increasingly mobile people, communities of common tradition and locality appear to be under threat from the advent of a fragmented market society. Are these complaints against individualism justified? And crucially, how should Christians respond to them? Digging down into the substance of these questions, this project will consider the theological, liturgical and scriptural resources Christians have for understanding the notion of individualism in relation to issues of education, public life and the formation of democratic citizenship.

« BETWEEN THEOLOGY AND THE POLITICAL (26-28 MARCH 2015) | Main | POSTLIBERALISM, INDIVIDUALISM AND SOCIETY (Friday 11th and Saturday 12th July 2014) »
Wednesday
Oct082014

MULTIPLE FAITHS IN POSTCOLONIAL CITIES: LIVING TOGETHER AFTER EMPIRE (6-8 MAY 2016)

Colonial powers bring their religion with them and often this religion becomes an instrument of rule. When empires fall, the residue of imperial suspicion lingers. When colonial powers beat a retreat, older religious resentments and new tensions may emerge. We hear daily news reports in cities around the world about violent clashes between Christians and Muslims, Buddhists and Muslims, Shia and Sunnis, Catholics and Protestants and more. Why have we not as frequently heard of postcolonial cities where people of multiple faiths peacefully coexist?  How do people of goodwill organize for cities based on multiplicity of identities, languages, religions, and shared public space? What role do theologians and theorists have in fostering collaborative spaces for faith communities to coexist in ways that work for justice for all people? How are the misuses of religion addressed? How do our religions and theologies need to change to foster people of multiple faiths living side by side after empire?

Call for papers available at http://religionandcivilsociety.com/multiple-faiths-postcolonial/

 

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