Search

Disquiet over the prevalence of social and economic individualism has a long history. In a world of mobile Capital and increasingly mobile people, communities of common tradition and locality appear to be under threat from the advent of a fragmented market society. Are these complaints against individualism justified? And crucially, how should Christians respond to them? Digging down into the substance of these questions, this project will consider the theological, liturgical and scriptural resources Christians have for understanding the notion of individualism in relation to issues of education, public life and the formation of democratic citizenship.


The University of Manchester
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Samuel Alexander Building, WG16
Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
Email: peter.scott@manchester.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)161 275 3064


The University of Manchester
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Samuel Alexander Building, WG8
Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
Email: michael.hoelzl@manchester.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)161 306 1663

Friday
Apr012016

AT HOME IN THE FUTURE: ESSAYS FROM THE HEIMAT PROJECT PUBLISHED!

Monday
Feb292016

Multiple faiths in postcolonial cities: living together after Empire

Click poster for information

Thursday
May282015

F. Gerald Downing: Formation For Knowing God

New publication by former Lincoln Theological College Tutor.

Read an excerpt from this new publication here

 

Wednesday
May272015

PETER SCOTT TO SPEAK AT CLIMATE CHANGE WORKSHOP AT MANCHESTER METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY 

Monday
May182015

LTI's REFLECTION on #GE2015: "thick" and "thin" choices

Immediate reactions to the UK General Election result have focused on inaccurate polls, shy voters, the rise of nationalism in the UK (SNP, UKIP), the UK’s wider relationships with continental Europe (including the EU), and the implications for mainstream political parties. Additionally, electoral reform seems to be in the air once more.

In this post, we try something different. It seems to us that “choice” was one of the key themes of the election. For example, the party leaders argued that we, the electorate, were confronted by an important choice at this election: between market forces vs the state, between the union and the nation, between economic stability and social justice. Here we make a strategic distinction between ‘thick’ and ‘thin’ choices. We argue that too often we are presented with 'thin' choices and that we need to uncover 'thick' choices.

To read the full post, click here [opens in new window].

Thursday
Apr302015

Religion and the Secular State: When Religion Challenges the Constitution

Public Panel Discussion:

  • Should there be room for Religion within a Secular State? 
  • Is Religion a Curse or a Cure for Society Today?
  • What are the current legal and political challenges Religion poses to Democratic Culture?

A panel of internationally renowned experts in Theology, Political Science, Sociology and Asian Studies will discuss these and related issues with the audience.  Everyone is welcome.

The Public Discussion will be preluded by a welcome reception reception on behalf of The Department of Religions and Theology at the University of Manchester and the Department for Globalisation Studies at the University of Groningen.

Date: 16th May 2015

Venue: Samuel Alexander Building Room A113

Time:

Welcome Reception: 17.00-17.30

Panel Discussion: 17.30-19.00.